1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE

1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE

1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE
THE PICTORIAL HISTORY OF IRELAND, From the Invasion by Henry the Second to the Present Times. Being A Compilation of the Philosophical and Statistical Points to Be Found in the Most Approved Writers On the Subject. By Sylvester O’Halloran. Undated, published circa 1850 (1845 is the most recent date cited in the Introduction) by Virtue & Yorston, New York. 10 x 7 tooled leather binding decorated with gilt, gilt dentels, gilt edges all around. Illustrated with Steel Engravings. Part I = 338 pages. Parts II and III = 480 pages. Condition: VERY GOOD ANTIQUE CONDITION. Gorgeous leather exterior as shown in photo. Firm binding, strong hinges. Text is clean and complete, minor foxing, toning, etc. No loose or missing pages. This is an enormous history of Ireland and the Irish people presented in three parts, or Divisions, as the book calls them. The First Division covers Irish history from the earliest times to the end of the Twelfth Century. It was written by Sylvester OHalloran and first published in the year 1775. His career as a surgeon was complimented by an interest in the arts, which began with his collection of Gaelic poetry manuscripts, leading to an interest in Irish history. He was one of the earliest historians writing in English to stress a positive view of the pre-Norman period of Irish history, which had been dismissed as a period of barbarism by most contemporary chroniclers. The Second and Third Divisions were prepared by a coterie of writers working under the supervision of William Dolby. The Second Division picks up at the close of the Twelfth Century, with the invasion of Ireland by Henry II, and continues to the end of the 17th century. The Third Division continues the narrative from about 1695 and the reign of William and Mary, and concludes about 1846. Subjects covered include: The Landing of the Milesians to the Present Time; All the Important Events of the Reigns of the Kings and Chieftains detailed in chronological order; Authentic Accounts of Their Several Wars with the Romans, Britons, Danes and Normans; With Graphic Descriptions of The Battle of Clontarf; Strongbows Invasion; The Death of King Roderick OConnor; Crowning of Edward Bruce King of Ireland; War of the ONeills and ODonnells Against England; Confiscation of Ulster; Cromwells Invasion; Persecution of the Catholics; War Between King James and William of Orange; Siege of Derry and Battle of the Boyne; Siege of Athlone; Battle of Aughrim; Siege and Treaty of Limerick; Penal Laws; The Volunteers; The United Irishmen; Rebellion of 98, and more. This amazing chronicle of Irelands proud but turbulent history is adorned with full-page steel engravings of Irish scenery, styled after the work of W. Needless to say, historians will treasure this book for its wealth of information and insight into Irelands past, especially in regard to the ancient history of the land. At the same time, genealogists will relish the attention to detail, particularly in the first division where author OHalloran devotes considerable attention to ancient Irish territories and the families in possession of them, lineages, pedigrees, etc. But of course you dont need to be a historian or genealogist to love this rare old book. If youre of Irish blood, thats reason enough to own this venerable record of your familys homeland and heritage. Its the kind of book you can proudly pass on to your sons or daughters and their descendants as an heirloom. To give you a better feel for the riches awaiting you in this grand history of Ireland, I have furnished some helpful information below. First, I have prepared a detailed summary of the books contents, from the First Division through the Fourth. Throughout my summary you will also find some examples of the illustrations which grace this book. All of this is to give you a clearer idea of just how truly incredible this antique volume is, and why you should seriously consider adding it to your own personal library or Ireland bookshelf. I hope youll take a few moments to have a look. CHAPTER ONE: The means by which the very early periods of Irish history have been preserved The landing of Partholan and his followers in Ireland A colony from Africa said to have preceded them The number of lakes and rivers then found in Ireland, with a remark Names of some places, why imposed Death of Partholan, and extinction of this people. CHAPTER TWO: The arrival of the Neimhedians, or second colony, in Ireland Their different battles with the Africans, till their final defeat Quit the kingdom in three divisions, two of which fail to Greece, the third to Britain. CHAPTER THREE: Of the Belgae or third colony of adventurers, and their arrival in Ireland. Their different appellations explained. Of Slainge the first Irish monarch, and his successors, to the reduction of this People. CHAPTER FOUR: Of the Damnonii or fourth colony, and why so called Their travels from Greece to their landing in Ireland. History of the Liagh-Fail Of the reigns of Breas, Nuadh, and Luigha. Origin of the famous Amach-Tailtin-Eocbaidh, Dealbhaoith, Fiacha, and’the three brothers, Eathoir, Teathoir, and Ceathoir, succeeding monarchs of Ireland, &c. CHAPTER FIVE: Remarks on the preceding relations Source of historical systems Early emigrations, condutced not by land, but by water Supported by the authorities of Moses, of Josephus, and of Tacitus, &c. Ancient fate of navigation. CHAPTER SIX: The Britons early in possession of letters Their supposed fabulous history explained Annals of Ireland Llhuid’s Hypothesis examined, and the close affinity between the Welsh and Irish proved Evidences that the first British colonies passed from Ireland A mistake of Bede’s corrected and the ancient name of Brittany pointed out. CHAPTER SEVEN: Britons, their first landing in Albion, and why so called The true meaning of the word Kimri of the landing of the Belgae, or second colony in Britain The arrival of the Damnonii, or third colony Of the Brigantes, or fourth people mistakes of British antiquarians, with respect to these different emigrants, explained Had a language in common with the Irish Not to be confounded with the Caledones Their different names explained by the Irish language Remarks of Llhuid elucidated. CHAPTER ONE: Origin of the Milesian Irish from Phaenius, the inventor of letters When he flourished Of Niul and his journey to Egypt Of Gadel, and the mistakes of some modern Irish writers corrected The names of Phaenians, Gadelians, and Scots imposed on the Irish, and why Of Eafru and Sru. CHAPTER TWO: The foregoing relation defended The Phnician and Irish alphabets the same Historical proofs and illustrations of the above Migration to Egypt Of the Atalantic isle of the Egyptians and tht Ogygia of Homer, &c. CHAPTER THREE: Migration of the Gadelian colony to Crete To Phnicia Of the Syrens Land in Getulia Proceed to Galicia, and found the city Brigantium Of Gollamh or Milesius and his exploits in Phnicia and Egypt of Heber and Heremon, and their resolution to quit Spain. CHAPTER FOUR: The uncommon care taken at all times to preserve the history of the voyages of the Gadelians Illustrated by, and illustrating the early Greek history Letters of the primitive Greek alphabet Objections answered Introduced into Greece long before the days of Moses. CHAPTER FIVE: The Cadmean letters of the Greeks and the Irish In their original order The Greeks supposed to possess an occult manner of writing Figure of the Irish Ogham Proofs and reasons offered, to shew that the Gadelian colony were the first reformers of Greece. CHAPTER SIX: History of the Hyperborean island Ireland the country alluded to Of Abaris the Hyperborean Great lights thrown on these relations Objections to them removed. CHAPTER SEVEN: Mistakes of later Irish writers, with respect to the voyages of their ancestors The names of places and passages still so well preserved as to point out the exact line Their landing in Cyprus The fable and name of the Syrens explained Settlement in Getulia, before the days of Joshua Called a Scythian colony Of Carthage Retire to Galicia Of the ancient Brigantium, and the Spanish history of it. CHAPTER ONE: Ith lands in Ireland to explore the country Is appointed umpire between its princes; and is highly caressed Suspected for a spy Is attacked and mortally wounded, and most of his party cut off The remainder return to Spain. CHAPTER TWO: The Milesians prepare to invade Ireland Names of the principal leaders in this expedition Land in Kerry Consent to reimbark and put to sea The loss they sustained in relanding Attacked by the Danaans in their intrenchments, and repulse them Advance into Meath, and engage the whole Danaan army which they defeat with great slaughter, and possess themselves of the country. CHAPTER THREE: The policy and humanity with which the Milesians treated their new subjects, contrasted with the opposite conduct pursued since the Revolution, and the effects of both Partition of Ireland by the conquerors, and their attention to its improvement Heber and Heremon engage in battle in which Heber is slain. CHAPTER FOUR: Heremon proclaimed monarch Landing of the Picts, and history of that people Remarkable alliance between Heremon and them He grants them settlements in Britain Landing of the Brigantes there Death and character of Heremon. CHAPTER FIVE: The reigns of Muimhue, Luighne, and Laishne of Er, Orba, Fearon, and Feargna Of Irial Eithrial Conmaol of Tighernmas He institutes the law of colours Mines worked to great perfection Adores an idol. CHAPTER SIX: Of Bel and Samhain, the principal deities of ancient Ireland, and of those of an inferior order The transmigration of souls part of their doctrine The reigns of Eochaidh, Cearmna, and Sobhairce, Eochaidh II, Fiacha, Eochaidh III. Aongus, Eana, Rotheachta, Seadhna, Fiacha II, Muinheamhoin, and Aldergoid. CHAPTER SEVEN: Mistakes with respect to Irish history corrected Their mode of succession no proof of barbarity possessed arts and sciences in an eminent degree in those early days Their frequent feuds no proof to the contrary. CHAPTER ONE: The reign of Ollamh-Fodhla Reforms the constitution, and establishes the famous Feis-Tamhrach Their manner of assembling, and the objects of their deliberations Other assemblies of an inferior nature Of Fion, Slanoll, Geide, Fiach III, Bearngal, and Olioll, succeeding monarchs. CHAPTER TWO: The reign of Siorna Of Rotheachta, and the rise of military chariots Elim Giallacha Art and the origin of fortifications in Ireland Nuadha Breasrigh Eochaidh IV. Great intercourse between the Irish and Carthaginians Fionn II. Seadhna Simon Duach Muiredheach. CHAPTER THREE: The reign of Eadhna, and the rise of mints in Ireland Lugha, Sior-Laimh, Eochaidh V. And the difference between the currachs and ships of the Irish Eochaidh invades Greece Eochaidh VI, Lugha II, Conuing, Art II, Fiachadh IV, Airgeadmhar, Duach II. CHAPTER FOUR: The union of the principal Branches of the house of Ir to preserve the monarchy in their family The reigns of Aodh, of Dithorba, and Ciombhaoth Building the palace of Emania The earliest account of stone buildings in Ireland The mistakes of writers with respect to the reigns of the above princes rectified Of Macha, Mong-Ruadh Reachta becomes monarch The nature of his war with the Picts explained. CHAPTER SIX: Loaghaire proclaimed monarch Murdered by his own brother, who succeeds him Maon, grandson to Laoghaire, is conveyed to France, and soon arrives at the supreme command of the Gallic troops Onvades Ireland, and gains the monarchy A curious remark of Cenau explained of Meilge, Modh-Chorb, and Aongus, successive monarchs of Ireland. CHAPTER SEVEN: The reigns of Jarereo, Fearcorb, Conla, Oilioll III, Adamar, Eochaidh VIII, Feargus Of Aongus III He assists the Carthaginians The sources from whence his present majesty is descended Of Conall, Niadh, Seamhuin, Eanda, Criomthan, Ruighruidh the Grand, Jondhabhar, Breasal, Lughaidh IV, Congall, Duach, and of the Clana Deagha; Fachtna, Eochaidh IX, and of the different partitions of Ireland Power of the Heremonians, and. Origin of the palace of Cruachan. CHAPTER EIGHT: Eochaidh X. Singular terms of his niece’s marriage Invasion of Ulster National assembly at Cruachan, and the Ulster war renewed Battle of Muirtheimhne Deirdre carried off by the sons of Uisneach, and the fatal consequences Death of Meibhe Dohertys description Insolence and banishment of the bards The ancient mode of interment The king of Ulster’s life saved by the operation of the trepan, and remarks on the early state of physic Of Eidersgeoil, and Nuadha II. CHAPTER ONE: Antiquity of chivalry in Europe Utility of Irish history in such enquiry Five equestrian orders in Ireland Knights, a particular order in the fate Their education and elevated sentiments Caesar and Pausanias justified. CHAPTER THREE: Of Conaire the Grand Mistakes in the genealogy of this house corrected, and the national annals defended Its different branches pointed out Imposes a tribute on the people of Leinster His other acts to his death Of Lughaidh, Connor, and Criomthan, his successors. CHAPTER FOUR: Of the Attachotic war, and the usurpation of Cairbre Moran refuses the diadem, and brings back the people to their duty Of Fearaidach the Just, and of Moran s famous collar Some passages in Tacitus illustrated Of Fiachadh. CHAPTER FIVE: Of Fiachadh The insurrecliom in Britain, and battle on the Grampian-Hills A revolution in favour of Elim Succeeded by the famous Tuathal The great reforms made in the state by this prince Exploits in Britain Conduct of Eochaidh, king of Leinster, the cause of the Boirimhe-Laighen Impolitic conduct of other Leinster princes, particularly injurious to their country Remarks on the Leinster tribute. CHAPTER SIX: Of Mal Feidhlimdh the Law-giver Different attempts made towards a reformation of the laws and constitution The Lex Talionis substituted for the law called Earc, or Eric Of Cathoir the Great His remarkable will, and the principal families descended from him. CHAPTER EIGHT: Conaire, the son of Mogha-Lamha, proclaimed monarch Remarks on this election The settlements of the three Carbres, his sons Olioll, kingof Munster, demands the Leinster tribute Death of Conaire, and election of Art, the son of Con Mac Con applies to him for protection, and is refused Raises a large army of foreigners, with which he invades the kingdom The general Fion deserts the Imperial standard An account of the battle of Muicruimhe The first regular Scottish or Irish settlement in Albany Will of Olioll, king of Munster, &c. CHAPTER ONE: Lughaidh proclaimed monarch Cormoc Cas succeeds to the crown of Munster His exploits in Britain and Ireland, and his liberality to the bards Principal families of the Clana Ith, or Irijh Brigantes Cormoc forms a party to gain, the monarchy Lughaidh killed and Cormoc disappointed in his schemes by Feargus Raises a very large army, and attacks and defeats the imperialists in the battle of Criona Exploits of Lugha, and death of Feargus. CHAPTER TWO: Cormoc proclaimed monarch Remarkable dream of Cormoc’s mother Makes some reformations in the national code, &c. In a convention of the states at Tara Enlarges the palace of Tara, &c, The splendour of his court Founds new academies at Tara Revenges the murder of the vestals at Tara, and imposes an annual tribute on the Lagenians Ravages the coasts of Britain and Gaul His son slain in his presence by Aongus; whom he obliges to fly, and is protected by the king of Leath- Mogha: against whom Cormoc wages war, but is defeated. CHAPTER THREE: Eochaidh Gonnadh elected monarch Succeeded by Carbre Liffechaire Assists Carausius against the Romans in Britain Is defeated by the Lagenians Account of the origin and constitution of the Leinster hereditary militia, destroyed in this reign. CHAPTER FOUR: History of the province of Leath-Mogha, or southern half of Ireland Reign of Moghcorb Invades Denmark; defeats the king, and places that kingdom under the government of his uncles Attacks and overcomes the king of Munster Is slain in a battle with the Mamonians The two Fathachs made joint-monarchs Account of the successes of Moghcorb Munster invaded by the monarch Fiacha, who is slain in an engagement with the Collas Colla Uas proclaimed monarch And is succeeded by Muireadhach, son of Fiacha Who sends the Collas against Ulster; they attack and defeat Fergus-Fogha, king of Emania, and plunder and defray his palace Muireadhach defeated by Colbhadh, who succeeds him in the monarchy. Patrick made captive Regulates disorders in Ireland; and undertakes another expedition against Gaul; is killed on the Banks of the Loire. CHAPTER SIX: Account of Nialls issue Is succeeded in the monarchy by his nephew Daithi, who grants an asylum to refugees from Britain, Gaul, and other parts of Europe Joins with the Picts, Saxons, etc. In invading the Roman settlements in Britain The Romans having withdrawn their troops from Britain, the Scots and Picts break through the Roman wall, drive the Britons from their defences, and plunder the country Daithi advances against the Romans in Gaul, as far as the Alps, where he is killed by lightning. CHAPTER ONE: Loghaire elected emperor Successfully invades Britain Attacks the Lagenians but is defeated and taken prisoner Released on conditions which he refuses to observe New settlements of the Heberians in Leinster Of the religion of the Druids, and its effects on the morals of the people The first introduction of Christianity into Ireland, not from Rome, but Asia or Africa The flourishing state of the Irish church before the landing of St. CHAPTER TWO: Churches and schools founded, and bishops established, before the arrival of St. Patrick Pope Celestin sends Palladius to Ireland A passage in Prosper on this embassy, explained and defended Is succeeded by St. Patrick his manner of conducting the mission The number of bishops consecrated by him, accounted for Is appointed one of the committee to examine the national records Remarks upon it. CHAPTER THREE: The manner in which St. Patrick spread Christianity over Ireland Said to have been the first introducer of letters there This charge refuted; and the great antiquity of our alphabet proved Origin of the celebration of Easter The churches of Asia and Ireland differed from Rome in their time of celebrating this feast Collumbanus and Colman, &c. Zealous defenders of this mode of discipline Remarks on, and inferences drawn from, these disputes. CHAPTER FOUR: Civil history of Ireland resumed Britain continues to be ravaged by the Irish, who thereby makes diversion in favour of the Gauls and Germans, engaged against the Roman power on the continent Vortigern elecled chief of the Britons, after they were deserted by the Romans Calls in the aid of the Saxons, who soon make a treaty with the Irish, and establish themselves in Britain. CHAPTER FIVE: Oilioll-Molt elected monarch The Druids removed from the assemblies of the states, and the Christian bishops succeed them The assemblies of Emania and Cruachan, for the regulating trade and commerce, frequently called together St. Patrick Invasion of Albany by the sons of Ere, who establish a new monarchy in North Britain Account of the seminaries of learning, learned men, and religious foundations in Ireland Death of Lughaidh. CHAPTER ONE: Of the monarch Mortough, and his wars An Irish government erected in Albany Nature of the connection between the Irish and Picts explained Of the first and succeeding Irish who emigrated to Albany, to their erecting of a monarchy, and reducing of the Picts Their successors lose the arts and letters, which they possessed The use of them, on their revival, to establish a high antiquity in Britain, and the reason. CHAPTER TWO: The same subject continued A new system of Scottish history and antiquity Mac Pherson’s Ossian replete with anachronisms, and the pains taken to impose it on the world for a genuine performance Dr. Mac Pherson’s Dissertations Ireland the ancient country of the Albanian Scots; and these last and the Picts always considered as different nations. CHAPTER THREE: Tuathal Maolgarbh chosen monarch of Ireland Is assassinated Dearmod elected to the throne Inquiry into the origin of the ceremony of anointing the monarchs at their inauguration And Ireland’s claim of precedency before any other nation of Europe. CHAPTER FOUR: Dearmod convenes the estates at Tara Invasion of Conaught by the sons of Mortough Battle between Eugenians and Clan Breogan Another meeting of the estates at Tara ; fatal effects of a private quarrel there Dearmod makes war upon the king of Conaught; defeats him, and imposes a humiliating ceremony, on making peace Character of Dearmod Death of his son Great pestilence in his reign Dearmod is slain by the king of Ulster. CHAPTER FIVE: Fergus and Daniel monarchs Of Eochaidh and Baodan Of Ainmheric Of Baodan Is defeated in battle, and flies for refuge to St. Columba An account of this famous apostle of the Picts Of the monarch Aodh The parliament of Drom-Chette The objects of its deliberations. CHAPTER SIX: Privileges of the Irish literati, and their abuse in some instances The Albanian Scots declared an independent people The death of the monarch Aodh, and the Archiepiscopal See of Leinster transferred from Kildare to Ferns Flourishing state of letters Of St. Bridget, patroness of Leinster The number of academies, holy men, and pious foundations. CHAPTER SEVEN: The state of arts and sciences, in these ages, much more respectable than has teen supposed The archbishoprics of Leinster and Conaught founded in this century Remarkable synod of the clergy at Clonard Many new bishoprics erected An account of some abbies, particularly of Benchoir etc. And the manner in which the religious employed their time. CHAPTER ONE: Aodh-Uraiodhnach elected monarch Attacked by Aongus, whom he defeats Is slain by Maolcobha-Clearach, who succeeds him Suibhre-Mean raised to the monarchy Slain in battle, and succeeded by Daniel; who engages and defeats Conall, king of Ulster Marches into Meath to attack the descendants of Niall the Grand, who implore the aid of St. Fechin A panic seizes his army, and he is obliged to make submission to the offended monk Death of Daniel Conal Claon made emperor, who associates his brother Ceallach in the government Dearmod and Blathmac elected monarchs A great plague in Ireland. CHAPTER TWO: Seachnasach raised to the monarchy Ulster invaded by the Picts, who are repulsed Death of Seachnasach, who is succeeded by his brother The Picts again invade Ulster Fionachta attacks the monarchy whom he kills in battle, and is saluted emperor Loingseach succeeds him. CHAPTER THREE: State of learning in Ireland, and of the church Account of illustrious men and eminent writers, their works, and religious foundations And of the part they took in the conversion of the Saxons to Christianity. CHAPTER FOUR: Continuation of the ecclesiastical history and state of learning in Ireland Mezeray’s testimony of the great improvements made in the manners of the people, and the cultivation of the lands in Gaul, by the Irish missionaries Saints of Ire- land ranked in three classes Enumeration of Irish saints Affinity of the Celtic and Irish languages instanced in an ancient copy of the Pater-Noster in those tongues. CHAPTER FIVE: Conghal, son of Fergus elected monarch of Ireland Succeeded by Fearghal Who attempts to exact tribute from the Lagenians, and is slain in the battle of Almhuin Fogartach raised to the monarchy Succeeded by Cionaoth Flabhertach, it/ho resigns the throne, and retires to a monastery Succeeded by Aodh-Ollan A synod at Tirdaglas Battle of Athseanuigh. CHAPTER SIX: Account of eminent men and their works Adamhanus abbot of Huy, attempts a reform in the discipline of the church of Ireland Virgil arrives in France, on his way to the Holy Land; is caressed by Pepin, and becomes his confessor Has a dispute with the Bishop of Mentz; and pope, on an appeal, decides in favour of Virgil. CHAPTER ONE: Reign of Aodh VI. And first appearance of the northern pi- rates, not Danes, strictly speaking, but an assemblage of different nations Their incursions not caused by a redundance of inhabitants Associate to preserve their religion and liberties The monarch invades Leinster, and exonerates the clergy from their attendance on the army Ravages of the Danes king of Munster demands tribute from Thomond, but relinquishes this claim The Danes defeated near Waterford Return in greater numbers. CHAPTER TWO: The reign of Connor Battle of Druim-Conla French devastations of the Danes, and death of the monarch Of Niall III and the landing of Turgesius Miserable state of Munster and antiquity of its cities Leinster over-run, and the reduction of the kingdom projected Death of Niall Of Malachie I, convention of the estates of Leath-Cuin, and several defeats of the Danes, but triumph at length. CHAPTER THREE: Tyranny exercised by Turgesius Case of the Moors of Granada and Huguenots of France after their reduction, very different from that of the Catholics of Ireland Justified for taking up arms on Revolution principles Inprecedented restraining laws passed against them, and the consequences of them. CHAPTER FOUR: The Danes still triumphant Turgesius demands the daughter of Malachie for a mistress Malachie conspires to circumvent him and restore liberty to his country The Danes everywhere subdued Mistake of Keating, and singular character of Malachie. CHAPTER FIVE: Of Aodh VII. And the artifices of the Danes to gain a new footing in Ireland They become again terrible to the natives Reign of Flan, and his invasion of South Munster Singular reason for entering North Munster, and his defeat there The Danes avail themselves of these intestine broils Of Cormoc, king of Munster Cause of his invading Leinster His will Defeat and death in the battle of Maigh-Ailbe. CHAPTER SIX: State of letters in the tenth age Clement and Albin first regents of the universities of Paris and Pavia A mistake of M. Fleurys corrected, and a further account of Clement Of Dungal, Donatus, Moengal, Feidhlim, the Abbot Patrick Of the celebrated Scotus, and some account of his works A different person from John Scotus, professor at Oxford Of Qrnulphus and Buo Remarks on the erection of schools in France Decay of Irish hospitable houses there. CHAPTER ONE: Of the monarch Niall, with a retrospective view of Irish affairs A fresh invasion of the Danes Battle of Ceannfuad A more fatal one near Dublin, in which the monarch fell Storm of Ardmagh Donachad elected monarch; engages and defeats the Danes Review of the affairs of Munster Invaded from Connaught Lorcan succeeds to the crown of Munster battle of Roscrea, and defeat of the Danes. CHAPTER TWO: Contest between Cineidi and Ceallachan for the crown of Munster Cineidi relinquishes his claim to Ceallachan Manner of proclaiming him A confederacy formed against Cineidi He unites with Ceallachan against the common enemy Battle and defeat of the Danes near Limerick Again at Cork, with the taking of Cashell and Waterford Bad policy of the Irish, with regard to these foreigners Deliberations of the parliament of Munster, at Cashell. CHAPTER THREE: The Danes form a deep-laid conspiracy, under the pretence of marriage, to get Ceallachan into their hands, and succeed The terms on which they propose to release him, and his own private instructions to his ministers The Mamonians raise a large army, and fit out a powerful navy to redeem Ceallachan Armagh taken by assault Naval engagement off Dundalk, the prodigies of valour performed by the Irish, and release of Ceallachan Triumphant return to Munster. CHAPTER FOUR: Death of the monarch Donochad, and election of Congalach Defeats the Danes in two pitched battles Fate of Munster and death of Ceallachan Objections to his history answered Succeeded by Feargradh History and exploits of Mahon, king of Thomond Succeeds to the crown of Munster, and defeats the different leagues formed against him, but is at length treacherously slain. CHAPTER FIVE: History and exploits of Brien, until crowned king of Munster Dispossesses the Danes of Inis-Catha and other islands of the Shannon, whose churches and monasteries he caused to be rebuilt and re-edified Other reforms of Brien Annual revenues of the Munster kings, and the stipends paid by them to their tributaries Review of the military power of Munster State of Leinster and Ulster, and death of the monarch Domnald. CHAPTER SIX: Malachie elected monarch, and triumphs over the Danes A confederacy formed against the king of Munster, which he disperses, and is saluted king of Leath-Mogha The distinctions between a king of Thomond, a king of Munster, and a sovereign of Leath-Mogha Wars between Malachie and Brien Revenue paid by Leinster to the king of Leath-Mogha Battle of Glean-Mamha States of Ireland propose to depose Malachie He gets time to prepare for his defence Is disappointed, and is granted further time Surrenders the diadem to Brien Presents received on such occasions. CHAPTER SEVEN: The conduct of Brien and Malachie, in the preceding revolution, justified Brien receives hostages from the different princes of Ireland, and is crowned at Tara Holds an assembly of the national estates Surnames established with observations on them His attention to justice, and to the restoration of religion and letters His exchequer revenues as monarch, and improvements at Cincoradh, with the etiquette of his court. CHAPTER EIGHT: The king of. CHAPTER NINE: Writers of the tenth century St. Cormoc, an account of his famous work, called the Psalter of Cashell A detail of other eminent men, with the list of the works of some of them. CHAPTER ONE: No national advantages made of the late great victory Retreat of the Munster and Leinster forces Cian assumes the title of king of Munster, and demands hostages from the sons of Brien, which are refused Character of Cian His pretensions opposed by Domhnal Retreat of the troops of North Munster The prince of Ossory demands hostages of them, and is refused The Munster troops prepare for battle, and are joined by their sick and wounded The Ossorians generously refuse to attack them Battle of Maigh-Guillidhe. CHAPTER TWO: Malachie again saluted monarch by the Clan-Colman, but not elected by the national estates Righe-go-freasabhra, its import Malachies remarkable account of the battle of Cluantarff Takes Dublin by assault Civil commotions of Munster Of Leinster Malachie repents his former conduct, and devotes the remainder of his life to acts of piety. And charity Contentions in. Munster The Heremonians appoint a protestor Remarks. On this title Donough O’Brien overruns Leinster, Meath, and Conaught His issue Is. Defeated by his Nephew Turlogh, resigns the. Crown and retires to Rome The Powers, Plunkets, and Eustaces, of the race of O’Brien The pretences of Rome to the command of Ireland inquired into and refuted. CHAPTER FOUR: Council of Fiadh-├ćngusa State of the church of Ireland, its privileges, and the great power of its metropolitans Reformations wanting in it The first instance since the days of Patrick of a legate, with powers from Rome, presiding at a council of Irish bishops Acts of this council, with a remarkable prayer Writers of the eleventh century. CHAPTER SIX: Mortogh assumes the title of monarch Opposed by O’Connor Falls in the battle of Litterluin Fate of the Irish church St. Bernard’s charges against this church and clergy, candidly examined and refuted Necessity of circumscribing its powers Council of Kells Four archbishops presented with palls, with a list of their suffragans. Makes peace with O’Ruark The indirect use made by him of this peace. CHAPTER ONE: Landing of the Welsh adventurers, and junction with the army of Mac Murchad Assault Wexford three different times, and are repulsed Delivered up by composition Mac Murchad invades and lays waste the principality of Ossory The monarch, alarmed at his success, directs him to cease further hostilities, and dismiss his auxiliaries Through the intercession of the Leinster clergy, Mac Murchad agrees to a fresh peace, and breaks through every article of it Enters into treaty with the king of Thomond New Spain discovered Landing of Strongbow, and capture of Waterford They march to Dublin Dublin surprised, and the massacre of its inhabitants Remarks on this success, and on the council of Ardmagh. CHAPTER TWO: Henry, by proclamation, recalls his subjects from Ireland The situation which this, and the death as Mac Murchad, reduces them to Offer a formal surrender of their conquest to Henry, which he refuses Dublin besieged by Roderic The garrison offer to submit and surrender Their proposals rejected Surprise the camp of the monarch, and disperse his troops The siege of Dublin raised Henry receives the submission of Strongbow, and invades Ireland The princes of Leath-Mogha submit to him Remarks on the parade of English writers. CHAPTER THREE: Synod of Cashell The bulls of Adrian and Alexander Complained of by Irish writers, and supposed spurious Real bulls The reasons that induced Adrian to grant a bull to Henry Why it lay concealed for sixteen years Ireland sacrificed to unite Alexander and Henry The conduct of Alexander not to be justified Cambrensiss account of the acts of the council of Cashell exposed Accept of the bulls The letter of O’Ruark, for style, language, and sentiment, infinitely superior to what is contained in those bulls. CHAPTER FOUR: Henry acknowledged as sovereign of Leath-Mogha Leath-Cuin still an independent kingdom Henry neither conquered Ireland nor established a new code of laws there Some similarity between the Irish revolution in 1172, and the English one in 1688 English and Irish accounts of the peace at Windsor in 1175 Proofs from both, that foreign laws were not attempted to be introduced Several proofs of the insincerity of early English writers Real force and extent of Poyning’s famous restraining law Necessity of recurring to the ancient constitution in inquiries of this kind Extent of the English mode of legislation to the reign of James I. CHAPTER FIVE: Containing an alphabetical list of ancient Irish territories, and by what Milesian families possessed, both before and after the invasion of Henry II. CHAPTER SIX: Objections to the authenticity of Milesian pedigrees answered All descended from three sons of Milesius, and from his uncle Ith Different septs of the same name Names of the Eoganachts, of the line of Heber The Ithian race Degaids of Munster and Irians The issue of Cormoc and Cian, of the line of Heber The race of Ir The Heremomans of Leinster, and the other septs established there The families of Meath Hi-Bruins and Hi-Fiacres of Connaught Families of Ulster, of the Collas, etc. CHAPTER ONE: Moral aspect of Ireland in the twelfth century Political tendency of the visit of Henry the Second Jealousy of his queen, and rebellion of his sons Fair Rosamond Henry summoned into Normandy to account for the death of Thomas a Becket Military and political arrangements by the king Meath appropriated to Hugh de Lacy Admiration of the English for their Saxon nobility a parallel case to that of the Irish for their native chiefs Supposed attempt of Henry to conciliate the relatives of Thomas a Becket Summary view of Henry’s general policy while in Ireland His return to Wales. CHAPTER TWO: Real extent of Henry’s conquest Conference between De Lacy and O’Ruarc Defeat of the English by O’Dempsey Strongbow called to Normandy ; his return Raymond le Gros retires to Wales General rising of the septs Raymond recalled; his marriage Confirmatory treaty between Roderic and Henry Death of Strongbow Burning of Limerick Strongbow’s character. CHAPTER THREE: Fitz-Aldelm’s arrival De Courcy enters Ulster Cardinal Vivian’s liberal exertions Treachery of Roderic O’Connor’s eldest son, Murtagli Devastation of Connaught Superseding grants given by Henry to John and his followers Appointments and recalls of De Lacy Death of St. Laurence O’Toole Bull of Pope Lucius the Third Retirement of Roderic O’Connor Arrival of John at Waterford. CHAPTER FOUR: Administration of Philip de Braosa John’s discourteous treatment of the Irish princes, and his impolitic behaviour towards the original men of iron Eight months of tyrannical folly and unsuccessful resistance The nature of Henry’s grant to John Retirement of Roderic O’Connor to the monastery of Cong Connaught devastated Argument on the constitutional consequences of Henry’s grant to John Death of Henry the Second, and testimonials of his character. CHAPTER FIVE: Accession of Richard the First Administration of young De Lacy Succeeded by the second Earl of Pembroke Followed by Hamo de Valois Death of Roderic O’Connor Educational and religious movements during Roderic’s reign Character and circumstances of the last monarch of Ireland. CHAPTER SIX: Accession of John Rivalry between De Courcy and De Lacy Removal of Hamo de Valois Administration of Meyler Fitz-Henry Divisions in the O’Connor family Partition of Connaught Arrival of John in Ireland Donations of the Anglo-Irish lords to the Church Building of religious edifices in Ireland near the close of the twelfth century. CHAPTER SEVEN: Accession of Henry the Third Confirmation of the Great Charter Death of the earls of Pembroke Irish troops called by Henry into Wales, Scotland, and Gascony Grant of the kingdom of Ireland to Prince Edward Feuds between the De Burghs and the Geraldines General rising of the septs State of Ireland at the close of the first century of connection with England. CHAPTER EIGHT: Accession of Edward the First Seizure of the Welch crown; and massacre of the Welch bards Ambition of the Geraldines Continued application by the Irish to Edward for English laws; and usual opposition of the Anglo-Irish barons New coinage Irish parliament Legal construction and social effects of the special charters of denization Irish troops called again by the troubles in Scotland Rare instance of justice. CHAPTER NINE: Accession of Edward the Second Administration of Piers Gaveston Succeeded by Sir John Wogan Practical operation of the special charters of denization as regards the person or life of the native Irish Consequences of the battle of Bannockburn Edward Bruce lands in Ireland Opposed at first by Feidlim O’Connor Treachery of Feidlim and Walter de Lacy Arrival of Roger Mortimer Interposition of the pope Eloquent remonstrance of the Irish, headed by O’Neill, Prince of Tyrone Defeat of Edward Bruce at the battle of Dundalk Internal warfare. CHAPTER TEN: Accession of Edward the Third Administration of the Earl of Kildare Succeeded by the Prior of Kilmainham Further explanation of the distinctions between the Irish feodary and the English subject Remarks of Daniel O’Connell Administration of Sir John Darcy Succeeded by Sir Anthony Lucy Assassination of the Earl of Ulster Edward’s rigour towards the Anglo-Irish nobles Self-appointed assembly at Kilkenny Administration of Sir Ralph Ufford More English law Administration of the Duke of Clarence Statute of Kilkenny Administrations of Sir William de Windsor, and the Earl of Ormond Astounding discovery. CHAPTER ELEVEN: Accession of Richard the Second Regency appointed Administration of the Earl of March and Ulster Succeeded by his son Followed by Philip de Courtenay Duke of Ireland created Administration of Sir John Stanley Succeeded by the Earl of Ormond Visit of King Richard to Ireland Death of the Earl of March Second visit of King Richard to Ireland The campaign with Mac-Morough Richard recalled to England by the defection of Henry of Bolingbroke Deposition of Richard Deaths of distinguished men in Ireland during the fourteenth century Nature of the darkness during that “dark” age Death of Richard the Second. CHAPTER TWELVE: The three Lancastrian kings Accession of Henry the Fourth Administrations of Lionel and Thomas, dukes of Lancaster, Gerald of Kildare, Sir Stephen Scroop, and Butler of Kilmainham Accession of Henry the Fifth Administration of Lord Furnival Petitions to the English king and to parliament Irish troops called into Normandy Administration of James, Earl of Desmond Important petition to the King of England Accession of Henry the Sixth Romantic marriage of the Earl of Desmond ; his untimely death ; and the reversion of his large estates to his uncle James Great power and enormous possessions of the Anglo-Irish lords State of the Irish exchequer Intrigues of Ormond and Desmond Administration of the Duke of York Rebellion of Jack Cade Rising of the O’Connors and O’Nials Battle of Wakefield. CHAPTER THIRTEEN: Results of the battles of Wakefield and Towton Accession of Edward the Fourth Administration of the Duke of Clarence by proxy James, Earl of Ormond beheaded The Geraldines in favour Earl of Desmond, the viceroy’s deputy Parliaments of Wexford and Trim Struggles between the Geraldines and the Butlers Earl of Worcester’s parliament at Drogheda Writs of attainder against Desmond and Kildare Desmond beheaded Kildare pardoned, and appointed deputy for viceroy Penalty of attainder against John, the sixth Earl of Ormond, removed, and the Butlers again in favour Then again Kildare and the Geraldines in favour Neetmok Ireland held in this reign by a deputy’s deputy for two successive infant princes, by the aid of one hundred and twenty soldiers Interference of Richard, Duke of Gloucester, with the accession of Edward the Fifth Kildare still in power Short usurpation of Richard the Third Ireland’s own affairs, her own sons, and her own religion. CHAPTER FOURTEEN: Policy of Henry towards the Yorkists Strength of the York party in Ireland Kildare suspected by the king Arrival of Simnel in Ireland German auxiliaries for Simnel Invade England, encouraged by lords Lincoln and Lovell Routed at Stoke Simnel transferred to the royal kitchen Henry summons the lords of the Pale to England Appearance of Perkin Warbeck Kil- dare disgraced, and Sir Edward Poynings appointed lord-deputy Poynings’s parliament Warbeck’s marriage Kildare regains the king’s confidence, and is appointed lord-lieutenant Warbeck makes another attempt in Ireland Although joined by the Earl of Desmond, is unsuccessful, and executed for treason Battle of Knocktow, and defeat of the Irish Collateral incidents at the close of the fifteenth century. CHAPTER FIFTEEN: Accession of Henry the Eighth Condition of the Pale Death of Kildare Succeeded by his son Gerald Removed by Wolsey to make way for the Earl of Surrey Kildare summoned to England Duke of Richmond’s administration Return of Kildare Summoned again to England Insurrection headed by Kildare’s son, Lord Thomas Sir William Skeffington’s adminis- tration Lord Thomas and his five uncles executed at Tyburn Henry’s endeavours to seize the next son of the earl Sir William Brereton’s administration Succeeded by Sir A. CHAPTER SIXTEEN: Ecclesiastical changes of the sixteenth century, and the commencement of their political influence upon the history of Ireland Character and death of Henry the Eighth. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN: A digression on digressions Continental progress of the “Reformation” Catholic and Protestant evidence regarding the religion which Henry the Eighth thought proper to oppose Leo in Italy and Luther in Germany preparing the way for Henry’s changes in England and Ireland. CHAPTER EIGHTEEN: Digression continued Progress of the “Reformation” through England, and safe arrival in Ireland Argumentative evidence of Catholic and Protestant authorities The subject sufficiently explained to proceed with the historical narrative in the next chapter. CHAPTER NINETEEN: Accession of Edward the Sixth Formation and proceedings of the council of regency Funeral of Henry the Eighth Coronation of the new king, and subsequent appointments Domination of Somerset The “Reformation” laid before the people of England and Ireland Bellingham’s administration New privileges for Dublin The English government send an Irish brigade to Scotland The Scots return the compliment in Ulster Brabazon’s administration Surrender of Boulogne Enforcement of the new English liturgy ; opposition of Dowdal Crofts’s ad- ministration Execution of Somerset Division of the O’Briens Desolation of Ulster Death. CHAPTER TWENTY: Accession of Mary Proclaimed in Dublin Catholic influence restored Movements of O’Neill Administration of Sir A. Leger Kildare reinstated Mary’s marriage with Philip of Spain The O’Briens and O’Neills at variance Brian O’Connor Faly reinstated Administration of Sussex Claims of Shane O’Neill Restoration of Dowdal Death of Mary Writers of Ire- land. CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE: Accession of Elizabeth 1558 to 1570 Policy of the new queen Consecration of Parker Administration of Sussex English liturgy reformed again Intrigues of the French and the Scots Treatment of the dissenters who did not conform to the act-of-parliament religion O’Neill’s visit to Elizabeth, and temporarily amorous regard of the lady Disputes between Ormond and Desmond Mac-Carty Mora’s visit to England Blowing up of the fort at Derry Death of Shane O’Neill Dublin parliament of 1569 Rebellion of the Ormond family Rising of Turlough Lynogh O’Neill Illustrative authorities. CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO: Reign of Elizabeth 1571 to 1580 Visit of the Earl of Essex to Ireland Operations of James Fitz-Maurice in Connaught Liberation of the Earl of Desmond, and his brother John, from the Tower Plague in Ireland Sidney re-appointed Death of the Earl of Essex The nobility of Leinster complain against Drury James Fitz-Maurice sent to France and Rome by the Earl of Desmond Death of Rory O’Morra Arrival of Fitz-Maurice’s fleet at Smerwick Death of Theobald Burke, and of Fitz-Maurice Subsequent warfare Treacherous treatment towards Desmond Activity of Pelham and Ormond Administration of Lord Arthur Grey Sir Walter Raleigh in the field General horror throughout Europe at Grey’s proceedings Historical authorities. CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE: Reign of Elizabeth 1581 to 1590 Lord Grey recalled Movements of Zouch Death of Dr. Sanders Ormond’s reinforcement Death of the Earl of Desmond Expatriation of the Catholic clergy and gentry Perrot’s administration Campaigns in Connaught, Munster, and Ulster Irish parliaments of 1585 and 1586 Shameful scramble for the estates of Desmond O’Donnel perfidiously kidnapped Perrot’s adulterated coinage Digression on the fate of Mary, Queen of Scots, for the sake of a comparison with that of Ireland Resignation of Perrot Appointment of Fitz-William Wreck of the Spanish armada Calumnies against O’Neill of Tyrone Suspicions of Elizabeth Tyranny of Fitz-William Commencement of the fifteen years’ war Authorities for the historical student to trace and examine. CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR: Reign of Elizabeth 1591 to 1603 Foundiing of Trinity College, Dublin Edict against the Catholic clergy Fitz-William succeeded by Sir John Russell Large force sent to Ireland under Sir John Norris Siege of the fort on the Blackwater Defeat of the English army General rising of the septs Alarm of the queen Earl of Essex appointed lord-lieutenant, and provided with an army of twenty thousand men Disappointment of the queen Departure of Essex Operations of Montjoy and Carew Critical situation of O’Neills affairs Arrival of succours from Spain Hasty battle Success of the English Attempts of O’Neill to rally the septs after the loss of Kinsale Campaign in Ulster Gallant defence of Dunboy Every living thing destroyed over the surface of Munster Retreat of the southern insurgents towards Ulster, where O’Neill perseveres until the death of Elizabeth Indicative evidence of historical authorities. CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE: Accession of James the First Administration of Chichester Guy Fawkes and grunpowder; imitated in Ireland Flight of O’Neill and O’Donnel Campaign of’Sir Cahir O’Dogherty Seizure of six counties in Ulster Lessons in the art of conferring civilization with an immediate profit Creation of boroughs and baronetage Shameful treatment of conscientious jurors Appointment of the “Commission for the Discovery of Defective Titles” Designs upon Connaught Character of James Authorities illustrating the acts and spirit of his reign. CHAPTER TWENTY-SEVEN: Sympathy with Scotland Rebellious rising in the north Parsons and Borlase exactly suited Real state of Ireland, as seen by the remonstrance at Trim to the king’s commissioners Proceedings of the confederates Positions of the king ; attitudes of the Dublin government ; policy of the parliamentarian party ; and spasmodic struggles at sincerity by the trio Disastrous disunion of the friends of Ireland Success of the spoilers Charles outdone in lying and intrigue Civil semi-barbarism of the times. CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT: Cromwell’s invasion of Ireland Specimen proceedings of two years of the government under him Administration of Ireton and Ludlow Addition of a pestilential plague to the other troubles State of Ireland at the close of the Puritan war Comparison of the English administration of Cromwell with those preceding and following Digression on the moral lessons and political benefits eventually resulting from the persecution of the Roman Catholics The scene temporarily changed to America Real and perpetual nature of American political superiority A character for Cromwell Interesting authorities. CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE: Restoration of Charles the Second Court of claims in Dublin Act of settlement Quarrels over the prey of iniquity More plots Administrations of Berkeley, Essex, and Ormond Executions of the Archbishop of Armagh and the Earl of Strafford Death of the king. CHAPTER THIRTY: Accession of James the Second Liberty of conscience proclaimed Inconsistency of the high church bishops Troubles of the king Protest- ant invitation to the Prince of Orange that he might seize the throne of his father-in-law Landing of James at Kinsale Movements of Hamilton and Antrim Rally of the Protestants at Derry Battle of the Boyne, between King James and the parliamentary king, William Douglas abandons the siege of Athlone Limerick successfully defended by beauty and bravery Folly of St. Ruth, and final fall of Athlone Battle of Aughrim Ginckle’s unavailing siege of Limerick James’s final retirement from public life Instructions from William to close the war Treaty of Limerick. CHAPTER ONE: Reign of William and Mary Church-and-state estimation of the Treaty of Limerick Immediate resumption and continual progress of the penal laws Accession of Queen Anne Legislative union of Scotland with England Disputes between the English ministry and the Dublin parliaments Accession of George the First Act of the 6th George the First Ireland’s darkest hour, and the lowest degradation of Christianity Wood’s conscientious copper United rally of the people Returning dawn of Irish liberty. CHAPTER TWO: Accession of George the Second Terror of the privileged tyrants at the union of the people by Swift Progress of the penal laws Census under the Duke of Dorset Bishop Berkeley and America Primate Stone and Ireland Quarrels of the factions over the surplus revenue Lucas as a writer Patient submission of the people until better times for Ireland. CHAPTER THREE: Accession of George the Third Continued agitation in Ireland Right of petition, and encouragement of the manufacture of paper by the receivers Lucas Flood G rattan Burke Revolution of the American colonies Sympathy of Irishmen Organization of the Volunteers. CHAPTER FOUR: Proceedings of the Volunteers The Americans disposed of by British submission Immediate rally of the church-and-state influence in Ireland Lord Charlemont cajoled Dispersion of the Volunteers Splendid accommodations for the spare energies of aristocratic patriots The principle of unity extending among the real people Rise of the United Irishmen. CHAPTER SIX: Legislative union of Great Britain and Ireland Awful pause under the paws of the British lion The scaffold for faithful patriots, but respectable titles for legislative liars and traitorous thieves Wonderful efforts of Daniel O’Connell, a champion of the people proper Glorious awakening of the English mind Death of George the Third Success of Catholic emancipation. CHAPTER SEVEN: Accession of William the Fourth Parliamentary reform obtained Movements for repeal Exertions of Daniel O’Connell Accession of Queen Victoria Father Mathew Declaration of Irish rights Sympathetic resolutions proposed in the American congress The national redemption of Ireland inevitable Close of the narrative. CHAPTER EIGHT: Expression of Sympathy, for Conscientious Curates. CHAPTER NINE: Digression of Advice to Rambling Readers. CHAPTER TEN: Conclusion of Caution, Pro Bono Publico. Innisfallen, Lake of Killarney. Peter’s at Rome. Valley of the Blackwater. Daniel O’Connell, M. 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  • Year Printed: 1850
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Topic: IRELAND
  • Binding: Fine Binding
  • Region: Ireland
  • Origin: American
  • Country of Manufacture: United States
  • Author: Sylvester O’Halloran
  • Subject: History
  • Original/Facsimile: Original
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Virtue & Yorston
  • Place of Publication: New York
  • Special Attributes: Illustrated

1850 BEAUTIFUL HISTORY OF IRELAND Leather Illustrated IRISH CELTIC RARE ANTIQUE